"The greatest lesson I was taught through this experience was that the best way to incite a change in the world, is by you yourself stepping up and becoming that changing force."

JASMINE GRAYSON
Fellow for Life, 2017-18

"As a result of participating in this program, I was able to get to know a population of children that are often misunderstood as being ‘bad’ kids. I learned that these at-risk youth are children who face a lot of challenges and take on responsibilities at home that the average child does not – so much so that going to school every day is a big accomplishment. I plan…to contribute to the knowledge base within the counseling profession about at-risk youth and using literature in therapy. I would not have had this opportunity without the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship."

JENNIFER PAYNE
Fellow for Life, 2017-18

“ASF served as a constant reminder of why I entered the heathcare profession – to help people. It never ceased to amaze me how eager families were to learn at my cooking and nutrition classes each week. Their genuine appreciation…inspired me weekly to develop lesson plans that were both enjoyable and impactful.”

HAMILTON BEHLEN
Fellow for Life, 2017-18

“As a future physician it is my duty to learn the art of medicine, which is the balance between science and human compassion. The Schweitzer Fellowship has provided me the opportunity to develop this skill as I served my community and as Dr. Schweitzer said, ‘The purpose of human life is to serve.’”

MADILYN TOMASO
Fellow for Life, 2018-19
previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow
Slider

Alabama Fellows & Projects

Autumn Beavers

Autumn Beavers

UAB School of Medicine

Beavers is focusing on improving the promotion of Health Sciences among students of the Academy of Health and Sciences Program at Carver High School through the development and implementation of a curriculum that strengthens students’ academic skills and increases exposure to and interest in professional health careers. Additionally, the program will seek to foster a strong sense of community and support as well as address issues such as self-esteem, academic confidence, professional development, and community involvement.

Community Site: Academy of Health Sciences-Carver High School

Domecia Brown

Domecia Brown

Samford University McWhorter School of Pharmacy

Brown will address risk factors for cardiovascular disease with a primary focus on improving uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes through medication education, drug adherence, and lifestyle modifications. The program will take place in Jefferson County’s 35211 zip code, which is known to have the highest prevalence of cardiovascular disease and stroke. The program will address nutrition education, incorporating physical activity, and adhering to current medication. The goal is for participants to understand their current condition and to establish healthy behaviors to prevent it from progressing to a more serious illness. Ultimately, the program will empower the participants to become proactive about their health and improve their quality of life.

Community Site: More Than Conquerors Faith Church and Bethesda Family Life Center

Cayla Bush

Cayla Bush

The University of Alabama School of Social Work

Bush is addressing substance abuse in Tuscaloosa, Alabama through preventive interventions with populations at high risk for substance initiation or relapse.

Community Site: PRIDE of Tuscaloosa

Rahul Gaini

Rahul Gaini

UAB School of Medicine

Following emergency department visits at Children’s of Alabama, psychiatric patients are often given a follow-up appointment at the Crisis Clinic. Unfortunately, a large portion of these patients are unable to make their appointments. Gaini is addressing the barriers that prevent psychiatric patients from attending. By identifying and alleviating these barriers, he aims to increase the number of patients that get the care they need. His hope is that he will be able to contribute to the efficacy of Birmingham’s mental health system and alleviate the burden of mental health conditions in the pediatric population.

Community Site: Psychiatric Intake Response Center at Children’s of Alabama, Crisis Clinic at Children’s of Alabama

Amber Ingram

Amber Ingram

The University of Alabama College of Arts & Sciences

Amber is seeking to address the emotional and social needs of at-risk youth, including a group of children in foster care, by providing them with an opportunity to take part in community outreach and advocacy on behalf of abused, abandoned, and feral animals. This project aims to help children develop leadership skills, cultivate an understanding of social justice issues, and provide a sense of belonging and connection to the community.

Community Site: Tuscaloosa Spay & Neuter Incentive Program

Heather Johnson

Heather Johnson

UAB School of Public Health

Johnson will increase the capacity of a local women’s shelter to establish a high-quality childcare center for children ages birth to five, tailoring the resource to meet the special needs of the residents.

Community Site: Pathways

Danielle Larkin

Danielle Larkin

UAB School of Nursing

Larkin is increasing caregiver self-efficacy in end of life care for home hospice patients in Birmingham by offering an extra layer of education and support by using simulation-based learning. Simulation-based learning aims to bridge the gap between knowledge and practice and help build basic assessment and medication management skills while increasing confidence and self- efficacy.

Community Site: UAB Hospital

Jessica McKenzie

Jessica McKenzie

UAB School of Public Health

McKenzie is addressing total daily physical activity, nutrition with an emphasis on healthy snacking, and healthy coping mechanisms and decision making in middle school girls from disadvantaged areas of Birmingham through the Girls on the Run (GOTR) program. This demographic of children is at greatest risk for obesity and chronic disease, and girls tend to experience a decline in physical activity after age eleven. Through GOTR, she will use a research-based curriculum to enhance the girls’ social, psychological, and physical skills. The program culminates with girls participating in a 5K, giving them a tangible sense of goal-setting and achievement.

Community Site: Girls on the Run Birmingham

Jason Perry

Jason Perry

University of Montevallo College of Education (Counseling)

Perry is addressing mental health issues of low self-esteem, anxiety, and social and cultural aspects that affect health such as financial literacy, education, workforce development, physical and mental health, etc. in Birmingham, Alabama by partnering with the City of Birmingham Mayor’s Office Division of Youth Services. To do so, he will create the “Birmingham Fellows”, a mentoring group of ten young men from a Birmingham City High School. These students will then use the newfound relationships, knowledge, and skills developed in the group to create and execute a community service project of their own to promote unity, leadership, and initiative.

Community Site: City of Birmingham Mayor’s Office Division of Youth Services.

Tammy Ruffin

Tammy Ruffin

UAB School of Education

Ruffin is providing health and financial well-being workshops for families served by Lifeline. As a former banker, Ruffin recognized that many individuals—particularly those who had low incomes—lacked the financial literacy needed to become economically secure. When experiencing financial distress, they often had health-related problems, too. Her program will seek to address both aspects, therefore, to arrive at a more holistic sense of well-being.

Community Site: Lifelines of Mobile

Edgar Soto and Rachel Tindal

Edgar Soto and Rachel Tindal

UAB School of Medicine

Soto and Tindal are addressing access to higher education in Birmingham City Schools (BCS) by establishing a community-based college and career advising program. The program will provide BCS students and their families with individualized advising during their junior and senior years of high school to prepare them for post-graduation success. In addition, the program will offer enrichment programs during the summer months focused on developing writing skills and transitioning from high school to college or career. Ultimately, the program hopes to support students to and through their transition from high school to higher education by partnering with BCS, local and regional colleges, and workforce training programs.

Community Site: Birmingham Education Foundation

Larissa Strath

Larissa Strath

UAB College of Arts & Sciences

Strath is addressing dietary effects on health outcomes for those with chronic illness in the community. She will bring nutrition education and resources to high risk areas and individuals who need it most. In addition to receiving nutrition counseling and learning about food’s impact on health, participants will also be a member of a group in which cooking techniques and group meals are shared promoting a sense of community and well-being. The program aims to not only make a difference in the physical and mental health of the individual, but also create healthy habits that can be passed along to others, creating long-term health equity.

Community site: Cooking Well

Adrienne Wallace

Adrienne Wallace

The University of Alabama Hugh Culverhouse Jr. School of Law

Wallace is providing legal services for end of life, medical decision-making and other needs for senior patients at the University Medical Center. By doing so, she is linking seniors in need of free legal assistance to the range of services at the School of Law’s Elder Clinic. In addition, she will train physicians and medical residents on how to identify and refer patients in need of legal services.

Community Site: University Medical Center

Adam Archer and Carl Okerberg

Adam Archer and Carl Okerberg

Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy

Academic Mentors: Dr. Jeanna Sewell and Dr. Bernie Olin
Site Mentor: Laura Bell
Site: Mercy Medical Clinic

Mercy Medical Clinic is a free and charitable clinic providing primary health care services to uninsured community members in and around Lee County. After some initial fundraising and piloting, Archer and Okerberg invested in a strategically planned vaccine inventory renewable in perpetuity by generous manufacturer vaccine patient assistance programs. Working with the devoted nursing, office, and pharmacy staff at Mercy, they developed and implemented a vaccination service for their patients.

As a result of the program:

  • 200+ patients have been screened for vaccine indication to date
  • 6 vaccines have been administered to date

The staff at Mercy Medical Clinic is sustaining the vaccination service with its successful integration into normal clinic operations.

As an avid reader of public health narratives and perspectives, my expectations of what I would learn from the hands-on experience afforded by the Schweitzer program were high, and they were exceeded exponentially. Being part of this fellowship meant being immersed in a network of dedicated people and work focused on making positive change, and upon completion it has provided an empowering understanding of what it means to have an impact that I will apply from here on.” Carl Okerberg

Through this fellowship, I have been allowed to see and experience the hardships that many Americans face today. My patients, along with the staff at Mercy Medical, have truly emphasized the growing need of dedicated servants in the healthcare field. Knowledge is useful only if applied and as a health care professional, I now understand the mandate to serve to the best of my abilities.” Adam Archer

Shivangi Argade

Shivangi Argade

UAB School of Nursing

Academic Mentor: Dr. Sallie Shipman
Site Mentor: Cris Brown
Site: Alabama Life Start

Argade addressed cardiac arrest emergency preparedness in Alabama public schools by reinforcing CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED) education to school staff. Argade assisted school faculty through email, phone, and personalized visits to help organize and implement the cardiac emergency drills in public schools. The project included the placement of an AED on campus and education on how to use it; the creation of a designated cardiac emergency response team and a written cardiac emergency response plan; as well as the initiation of an AED/CPR emergency drill conducted by school faculty at least once a year.

As a result of the program:

  • The lives of a child were saved at two different schools because of the practice of emergency drills.
  • 27,696 student lives are being positively impacted by school faculty through the implementation of cardiac emergency drills and learning the importance of CPR and AED use.
  • 59 schools have started implementing cardiac emergency drills at least once a year.
  • School nurses have stated the importance of conducting emergency drills and feel the need to practice them more than just once a year to make schools a safer environment.

Project Lifestart, through the leadership of Cris Brown and others at Children’s Hospital, is committed to sustaining the program.

The desire to help people is usually one of the reasons people enter into a career path as a healthcare professional. However, participating in the Schweitzer Fellowship this year has also taught me that it is also incredibly important to recognize how much you can impact the community in your own backyard. This experience has taught me that service can extend outside of healthcare settings (clinics, hospitals, etc.) to create a greater impact in determinants of health.”

Meg Boothe and Shannon Polson

Meg Boothe and Shannon Polson

Meg Boothe, Samford University, McWhorter School of Pharmacy
Shannon Polson, UAB School of Nursing

Academic Mentors: Dr. Marshall Cates and Dr. Patricia Speck
Site Mentor: Michael Lynch
Site: South Highlands Outreach Project, South Highlands Presbyterian Church

Boothe and Polson addressed the need for medical access as well as integrated primary care and mental health services for clients of the South Highlands Outreach Project (SHOP) while concurrently developing a strategic plan for a future clinic. In the interim, they connected all regularly attending participants with a primary care provider, mental health care provider, and designated pharmacy. Throughout this process Polson and Boothe also built important relationships with board members, volunteers, and South Highland Outreach Project staff to enhance their current programming methods. They provided case management to each individual participant, conducted medication reviews, and created wallet cards containing information about their mental health diagnosis and prescription medications. In addition, Polson and Boothe led a subcommittee of the Board of Directors through the Precede/Proceed Community Planning Model to explore the possibility of establishing an integrated primary care and mental health clinic. Ultimately, they networked the Board of Directors to a Fellow for Life who is starting a mobile clinic in the Birmingham area. A memorandum of understanding will designate South Highlands as a stop on the mobile clinic’s weekly schedule.

As a result of the program:

  • 20 of 20 regular participants in SHOP established access to a designated primary healthcare provider, psychiatric/mental health care provider, and pharmacy.
  • Each of the regular participants received an emergency wallet card containing information about their current medical conditions and prescription medications.
  • The South Highlands Board of Directors reached a voting decision to partner with a community agency mobile clinic to provide access to ongoing care to SHOP participants

Polson and Boothe will transition their project to SHOP’s new program manager over the summer so that the programming and project goals are sustained.

Throughout this past year, I learned the importance of humanity above all. While my knowledge, education, and expertise is so valuable—if I cannot relate or empathize with the population whom I serve, it can mean absolutely nothing. One day while I was interviewing a participant about his medications, I learned that he had been a successful author and written multiple books in his past career. That conversation has stuck with me. It is so easy to look down on someone that has been diagnosed with a mental illness or to think of them as “less than.” However, in that moment it was so clear to me how much value and brilliance is captured within their unique minds. There is much more we can relate to one another than not. In my future career, I hope to carry this experience with me each and every day.” Meg Boothe

This past year, as an Albert Schweitzer Fellow, I have been guided and supported in a way that has allowed me to use my time and talents in a purposeful partnership with others. As a healthcare professional, I am cognizant of the duty to improve conditions and address unmet needs of patients, yet constrained by a continuous lack of time and resources. This fellowship provided connection with other talented professionals, valuable mentorship and training resources that synergized our talents, bringing solutions. I am amazed at everything we addressed in such a short amount of time. It has unburdened my soul to see needs met. This fellowship year is a shining example of what interdisciplinary teamwork can accomplish under directed leadership.” Shannon Polson

Josh Bruce and Alison Footman

Josh Bruce and Alison Footman

UAB School of Public Health 

Academic Mentor: Dr. Robin Lanzi
Site Mentor: Karen Musgrove
Site: Birmingham AIDS Outreach

Josh and Alison provided free HIV tests to over 1400 people in 6 different communities across Jefferson County using BAO’s mobile testing unit. By using the unit, they were able to provide confidential HIV counseling and education while testing. They were able to expand outreach measures to include women’s shelters, bus stations, comedy clubs, universities, community events, adult bookstores, and local businesses, forming new relationships with other community organizations.

As a result of their efforts:

  • Increased HIV testing
  • Linked 4 HIV positive cases to care
  • Developed questionnaires to evaluate user’s experience and preferences invisiting the mobile testing unit.
  • Created protocols for other BAO staff when using the mobile testing unit

Birmingham AIDS Outreach will continue to utilize the mobile testing unit in providing free HIV tests across Jefferson County with the goal of expanding outreach to surrounding counties.

Through the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship, Alison and I have been able to approach utilizing the testing unit from a public health context. I have learned many things during the fellowship and expanded my work experience in areas I was unfamiliar with before. I have grown as a public health practitioner and now BAO has a sustainable mobile testing project that will continue from now on.” Josh Bruce

Through this experience I have learned about the importance of partnerships between community organizations and universities in working together to improve the health of communities. Working with BAO has inspired me to continue working with community organizations once I finish school. One day, I hope to provide students with similar opportunities that challenge them to engage and work with their surrounding communities the way that the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship along with BAO has done for me.” Alison Footman

Jacob Files

Jacob Files

University Alabama at Birmingham Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)

Academic Mentor: Dr. Amanda Willig and Dr. Turner Overton
Site Mentor: Anastasia Ferrell
Site: Birmingham AIDS Outreach

Files worked with a program at Birmingham AIDS Outreach called BFED (BAO Food and Education Delivery). This program works in collaboration with the 1917 HIV Clinic at UAB to provide food boxes to hundreds of food insecure HIV+ people within the Birmingham area. Files expanded the current program by providing more options for 17 clients who were also living with diabetes in addition to having HIV.

After bi-weekly calls over the course of several months, many of the clients started reporting healthy lifestyle changes as a result of his program. In addition, Files made a series of educational videos on diabetes that will be used for other clients and patients at BAO and the 1917 Clinic for years to come.

As a result of the program:

  • 100% of the clients self-reported learning more about diabetes.
  • 100% of the clients self-reported making healthy lifestyle changes as a result of the program.
  • YouTube videos that were created have been viewed 65 times and counting!

BAO and the 1917 Clinic will build upon his project by continuing to share the educational YouTube videos. In addition, BAO and BFED hopes to offer diabetic food boxes in the near future in order to offer healthier options for their diabetic clients.

As a result of my participation in the Schweitzer Fellowship, I have gained a deeper respect for the HIV+ clients here in the Birmingham area and the challenges that they face on a daily basis. It is my hope as a future healthcare professional that I will be able to positively impact patients such as these and make their lives less challenging.”

Sherilyn Garner, MPH

Sherilyn Garner, MPH

UAB School of Public Health

Academic Mentor: Dr. Robin Lanzi
Site Mentor: Raquel Patterson
Site: Oak Tree Ministries

Sherilyn developed and implemented Peace. Love. Youth. (in) Yoga (PLY2) for inner city youth living in a public housing community. The program was structured as a mindfulness and yoga curriculum and reached over 200 youth. Participating youth learned how to increase their self-awareness by meditating and performing traditional yoga poses.

As a result of the program, youth described the following changes:

  • “Meditation has started helping me from fighting people.”
  • “Yoga keep me calm and happy.”
  • “Meditation is something that keeps you calm.”
  • “Yoga takes bad thoughts off my mind.”
  • “Meditation…like a medicine to me.”
  • “Yoga at home help me calm down.”

PLY 2 will be sustained via a community partnership with A Friend of Mind. A Friend of Mind is a local nonprofit founded and managed by Sherilyn Garner. It will continue its work with Oak Tree youth, teaching them how to self-regulate their breathing, emotions, and behavior.

I’m reminded of a quote by Leo Tolstoy, who said:Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. If we don’t change, we don’t grow, and if we don’t grow, can we say that we’re living?’ Because of my fellowship experiences I have changed, grown, and now am living stronger in my truth of a mental illness survivor and mental health advocate.”

Amy Hudson and Nicole Lassiter

Amy Hudson and Nicole Lassiter

University of Alabama School of Medicine

Academic Mentor: Dr. Hussein Abdul-Latif
Site Mentor: Justin Johnston
Site: Community of Hope Health Clinic

Amy and Nicole piloted a holistic diabetes education program at Community of Hope, a free health clinic in Pelham. Nicole grew up watching her father manage his diabetes, which inspired her to develop a class curriculum that empowers patients to manage their diabetes. As a Type 1 diabetic herself, Amy understands that each individual has unique factors that affect their diabetes management. Amy and Nicole developed bilingual diabetes education classes focused on nutrition, exercise and stress management. Participants attended one-on-one sessions after each class to develop individualized plans to put the knowledge they learned into action.

As a result of their efforts:

  • 5 class participants reached their target A1c or weight loss goals
  • 2 patients transitioned into careers more accommodating for diabetes management
  • Development of a diabetes curriculum that can be used in the future

My time as a Schweitzer fellow has been a period of growth and learning. I’ve learned about service, community, patients, and myself in the process. I am happy to have heard the stories of so many wonderful people and received excellent advice from my mentors. I look forward to applying what I’ve learned to better serve patients and my community in the future.” Nicole Lassiter

Raina Jain and Michelle Kung

Raina Jain and Michelle Kung

Raina Jain, UAB School of Public Health
Michelle Kung, UAB School of Health Professions

Academic Mentor: Dr. Cayce Paddock
Site Mentor: Ashleigh Lockhart
Site: Sumiton Middle School

Jain and Kung taught life skills such as communication, coping, and time management to 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students at Sumiton Middle School. They taught ~350 students during their 2018-19 school year (from Sept-April), discussing methods for students to better cope with their everyday stressors: social pressure, school work, toxic relationships with friends and family, and more. Kung and Jain used the classroom time to introduce topics, providing links to websites and hotlines where students could access additional resources and help, if needed. They also provided small group sessions for 14 students to facilitate further discussion and application of classroom lessons.

As a result of the program:

  • 222 students practice at least one coping skill every day
  • 223 students improved communication skills
  • 255 students feel more knowledgeable about the risks associated with opioid misuse
  • 12 of 22 (55%) students that have ever misused prescription medications, reported decreased use of opioids over the past 3 months
  • 50 of 63 (79%) students that have ever tried cigarette smoking, reported decreased use of cigarette smoking over the past 3 months
  • 77 of 118 (65%) students that have ever tried vaping, reported decreased use of vape products over the past 3 months
  • 75 of 110 (68%) students that have ever drunk alcohol, reported decreased consumption of alcohol over the past 3 months

I’ve learned that you don’t need to be an expert to have a positive impact, if you approach the community with cultural humility, a willingness to learn and listen, and a sincere desire to help.” Raina Jain

This experience has changed how I view the opioid epidemic in America. As a student, the impact of the opioid epidemic is taught to us – through this fellowship, I was able to learn how opioid abuse can impact families, particularly the children, on a personal level.” Michelle Kung

Madilyn Tomaso

Madilyn Tomaso

University of Alabama School of Medicine

Academic Mentor: Dr. Sarah Morgan
Site Mentor: Mrs. Kathryn Strickland
Site: Central Alabama Community Food Bank

Madilyn improved the consumption of fruits and vegetables in adults at the Central Alabama Community Foodbank’s Corner Market by creating wrap-around services and individualized goal monitoring. Tomaso developed a curriculum to help instruct participants at the market on nutrition, physical activity, food waste, and other health-related topics. This curriculum was introduced so that participants could make informed decisions while they shopped at the market. A sample of the participants were selected for individualized goal monitoring, including monthly motivational calls and incentives. Through her encouragement, participants established a community walking group. Madilyn also worked with the Foodbank’s Summer Meal Program sites. She developed a curriculum titled “Summer Food, Summer Moves” which focused on choosing healthy snacks, increasing water consumption vs sugary drinks, increasing physical activity and reducing screen time. At the site Ms. Tomaso met regularly with children ages 5 to 15. Students were placed in developmentally appropriate groups for instruction on a variety of topics, such as playing outdoor games, drinking more water, and eating a variety of fruits and vegetables, and community gardening.

As a result of her efforts:

  • 7 out of 7 participants at the Corner Market who were followed for monthly goal monitoring had an improvement in at least one of the following: increased fruit and vegetable consumption by one or more servings per day, increased physical activity to at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic physical activity, increased self-reported meal planning and meal preparation, and/or report zero avoidable losses of products purchased at the market.
  • Established a community walking group with 13 committed participants.
  • 9 of the 17 students in the Summer Meals Program accomplished at least 2 of the 4 behavior changes: increase consumption of fruits and vegetables by one or more servings per day, replace sugary drinks with water, increase physical activity to the recommended 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day, and/or reduce screen time by 1 or more hours per day.

The “Summer Food, Summer Moves” program will be sustained by the local summer meal program site for future summer activities as well as the Central Alabama Community Food Bank. The Corner Market wraparound services will be sustained by the Central Alabama Community Food Bank and will serve as a template for future services.

As a future physician it is my duty to learn the art of medicine, which is the balance between science and human compassion. The Schweitzer fellowship has provided me the opportunity to develop this skill as I served my community and as Dr. Schweitzer said, ‘The purpose of human life is to serve.’”

Hamilton Behlen

Hamilton Behlen

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry

Academic Mentor: Diane Feagin
Site Mentor: Melodie Echols
Site: Norwood Resource Center

In the first phase of her project, Hamilton conducted cooking demonstrations and nutrition lessons for 75 children ages 4 through 13 at the Norwood Junior Master Gardener camp.  Due to the popularity of the camp program, smaller, family-oriented classes continued through the fall and winter with 11 families participating. The program encouraged families to cook more meals at home each week rather than rely on fast food or take out.  Children and their parents attended twelve, two-hour classes where they learned the basics of nutrition and cooking skills they could apply at home.

As a result of the program:

  • 75 campers were taught the importance of nutrition and introduced to new fruits and vegetables (Pilot Study, no data obtained).
  • 6 of 11 families reported cooking at least 1 additional dinner at home per week via pre and post class surveys.
  • 2 of the 11 parental units reported increased cooking skills via pre and post class surveys.

The Norwood Resource Center is sustaining the Saturday Cooking Club as a permanent community program.

“The incredible opportunity offered by the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship served as a constant reminder of why I entered the healthcare profession – to help people.  It never ceased to amaze me how eager families were to learn at my cooking and nutrition classes each week.  Their genuine appreciation for such a program in their community inspired me weekly to develop lesson plans that were both enjoyable and impactful.”

Ashleigh Burns Irwin

Ashleigh Burns Irwin

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine

Academic Mentor: Taraneh Soleymani, MD
Site mentor: Travis Stoves
Site: YMCA Youth Center

Ashleigh developed a health literacy program for K-1st graders at the YMCA Youth Center afterschool program that emphasized nutrition and healthy behaviors. This program focused on increasing the students’ knowledge of basic food groups, identifying healthy food and drink choices, trying new foods, as well as understanding the human body and how to keep it healthy.

As a result of this program:

Out of the 13 students that were enrolled in the program for the full year:

  • 10 students were able to name all five food groups
  • 11 students were able to name an example of each food group
  • 13 students were able to identify one unhealthy snack and a healthy alternative
  • 10 students were able to name 3 or more organs and describe their function
  • 7 students were able to demonstrate one or more yoga poses

The project will be sustained through the UAB chapter of the American Physician Scientist Association.

“Participating in the Schweitzer fellowship this year has given me the opportunity to be innovative and lead a project I feel passionate about, while also reinforcing the value of early intervention in the effort to eliminate health disparities.”

Katie Cassidy

Katie Cassidy

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing

Academic Mentor: Shannon Polson
Site Mentor: Shea Wiggins
Site: Alabama’s Muscular Dystrophy Association

Alabama’s Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) provides various programs and resources for children impacted by a whole spectrum of neuromuscular conditions. Katie has volunteered for four years in various roles with the kids involved in MDA. However, Katie realized that there was a need for support of the parents. Therefore, Katie created an online parent support group called Muscles Connect to bring together parents that are often socially and physically isolated from other adults due to the full time care needs of their children. Each month in the online group, a parent shared his/her story or a speaker would talk on topics that were meaningful to the group. In addition, Catherine, another Schweitzer Fellow and local artist, conducted an in-person art session so that meaningful connections could be formed among the group.

As a result of the program:

  • 42 participants joined the online group, despite the fact that half of potential participants surveyed before the fellowship project ranked their likelihood to engage in online support groups as neutral, unlikely, or not likely
  • 29 parents became more connected to the caregiver community and less isolated
  • Parents reported the online social media group, Muscles Connect, as the second best way they are able to connect with other parents of children with neuromuscular conditions, compared to social media previously being the seventh best way

Parents have taken leadership of Muscles Connect and Alabama MDA will assist.

“I have grown significantly as person and a professional through The Schweitzer Fellowship. Participating in this program has taught me to have a deeper respect for other professions and what we can accomplish when sharing ideas. As I move forward in my professional career, I will always keep in mind the concepts I have learned through a year of service learning. I will strive to first listen to a community’s needs before trying to act upon my own idea of what the need may be for a particular group or area.”

Raymond Dawkins

Raymond Dawkins

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry

Academic Mentor: Dr. Michelle Robinson
Site Mentor: Dr. Elaine Sides
Site: Christ Health Center

Throughout the fellowship I taught parents and children about the benefits of oral health through numerous health fairs, one-on-one educational sessions with parents, and oral hygiene instruction with the children. I conducted a large portion of my outreach efforts at Lovelady Women’s Center in order to create awareness of the Medicaid dental benefits available for children and to instruct parents on age appropriate methods to take care of their child’s teeth.

As a result of the program:

  • 52 pediatric patients were connected to a dental home and received treatment at Christ Health Center
  • 40 children measurably improved oral hygiene habits

The project may be continued through a School of Dentistry student organization as an on-going oral health community service initiative for underserved communities in Birmingham.

“This fellowship experience has taught me a great deal about myself and the ability that we all have to do something truly impactful. Throughout my project I have learned how to effectively communicate preventative health information to underserved populations, design health educational materials, and actively engage young children. In addition to the practical skills that I have gained through my service, I have grown from my experiences with other Fellows. This fellowship has served as an opportunity to step outside of the confines our respective academic programs to interact with a group of peers that share a common ethos, but with differing perspectives and capabilities. This type of multidisciplinary collaboration is essential to solving the world’s health problems and as a future health professional, I will continue to seek opportunities to learn in this way.”

Bhakti Desai

Bhakti Desai

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry

Academic Mentor: Dr. Allen Conan Davis
Site Mentor: Schelli Francis
Site: Cahaba Valley Health Care

Bhakti worked to improve the oral healthcare of the patients at Cahaba Valley Healthcare Clinic by providing oral health education to the patients at the Sunday clinics and setting personal goals for the patients to accomplish in the span of a month. This project later expanded to a free medical clinic (Equal Access Birmingham) where Bhakti continued to provide oral health education and is working to implement screening care for the patients, as well.

As a result of the program:

  • 81 patients received counseling regarding preventive oral healthcare and treatment options
  • 67 patients achieved their individual oral health goals within one month. These goals ranged from increasing water intake and decreasing sugary beverage intake to improving their current oral hygiene practices by, for example, brushing twice a day.
  • Created a bi-lingual oral health education curriculum centered on preventive oral healthcare.
  • Created a smoking cessation handout for Cahaba Valley Healthcare Clinic to use as needed

Bhakti will transition this project to the Academy of General Dentistry chapter at UAB as an ongoing service project.

“This experience has taught me the importance of patient-centered care and tailoring treatment to the individual patients specifically. Taking the time to actually listen to patients and understand where they are coming from can make an incredible difference in the treatment goals for that patient.”

Caroline Fuller

Caroline Fuller

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine

Academic Mentor: Hussein Abdul-Latif, M.D.
Site Mentor: Sally Allocca
Site: East Lake United Methodist Church

Caroline addressed childhood nutrition and exercise in the East Lake community by adding a nutrition curriculum to PEER, Inc’s summer camp. This program helped children from 2nd grade to high school learn how to exercise safely and eat healthy given their limited access to food and materials. She then led small group sessions with the East Lake After School program, with sessions on healthy cooking demos, sports lessons led by college athletes, and some yoga and pet therapy.  Students were empowered to take care of their bodies and their minds, while also sharing what they learned with their families, leading to a larger change in the community.

As a result of the program:

  • 35 students increased consumption of 3 or more healthy foods per week
  • 30 students replaced one more sugary beverages per day
  • 30 students increased physical activity for 30 minutes 3 or more times per week

A UABSOM student will continue the nutrition and physical education lessons through East Lake Tutoring Program for her Health Equity Scholars Project.

“Graduate school tends to be a selfish time, where the focus is growing your own wealth of knowledge. Schweitzer has allowed an opportunity to not only serve a population, but to be around other students who are also passionate about creating change. My experience being a Schweitzer Fellow has opened my eyes to many potential projects that one could take on. It seems that every week I see another project that I could do. While this can be discouraging, I have realized that seeing these opportunities, for a lack of a better word, is a really cool way to live. My dad has always said that being comfortable is a bad thing. If I am just living day by day being “comfortable” in my world and not acknowledging the challenges other people are facing, I am doing a disservice to myself. After this fellowship, I plan to stay out of my comfort zone, see the challenges that humans face, and do my best to lend that helping hand. Realistically, I know that throughout my life, I will not solve all humanities’ problems, but I feel optimistic that just seeing them and acting in whatever way I can, will lead to a more fulfilling life.”

William Gafford and Newton Tinsley

William Gafford and Newton Tinsley

Samford University, Ida Moffett School of Nursing

Academic Mentor: Amy Snow
Site Mentor: Lindy Cleveland
Site: Unless U

William and Newton addressed unmet medical needs for approximately 52 adults with developmental disabilities at Unless U by implementing preventative measures to optimize their physical well-being. The Fellow’s project focused on developmentally appropriate teaching of physical fitness and hygiene. They implemented a daily walking program as well as multiple interactive hand hygiene classes using Glo-Germ to facilitate evaluation of proper learning. Their project also prepared teachers/staff for medical emergencies that may be encountered from this vulnerable population. Gafford and Tinsley obtained an automated external defibrillator (AED) with a donation by Alabama LifeStart and taught teachers/staff the proper function and use of the device along with basic life support training.

As a result of their efforts:

  • 1 AED donated to Unless U from Alabama LifeStart
  • 7 out of 7 staff demonstrated correct CPR, ability to locate AED, and proper use of equipment in the event of an emergency (staff’s knowledge increased 67% on CPR/AED/emergency management).
  • 7 out of 7 staff rapidly and properly responded to a student’s seizure that occurred after our teaching on emergency management skills (staff more quickly and simultaneously stabilized the student in left lateral position, managed the students airway, and quickly cleared the scene of other bystanders while calling for proper medical personnel).
  • Student’s hands were 61.6% cleaner* (i.e., 61.6% reduction in germ-affected areas) after hand hygiene instruction
  • 0 out of 52 students were diagnosed with the flu since the hand hand-washing project began in August of 2017 (compared to 3 out of 52 students the previous year).
  • 40 out of 40 students increased physical activity by 30 minutes 3-4 times per week (beginning in July 2017-present). Staff also perceived increases in student energy (34%) and focus level (42%) after 8 weeks on the walking program.

The program will be sustained by the staff at Unless U and through the Fellows’ appointment to the Junior Board of Unless U. The school hired a full time teacher (Coach K) to solely focus on offering electives geared toward optimizing the well-being of the students and has partnered with the local YMCA who gave the students free memberships along with teaching special classes for them bi-weekly.

“This past year has been tough, but it has been one of the most rewarding times of my life! I love nothing more than spending a day at Unless U and seeing all the happy faces and doing what I can to help make these special individuals healthier. Being an Albert Schweitzer Fellow has helped me realize the impact that an individual can make on community organizations in need. Participating in this fellowship has been an eye-opening experience on how loving/serving others can truly benefit you more than any selfish plans that you may have for yourself. I think Newton and I are especially good at interacting with adults with special needs whenever we encounter them in clinical practice or out in public, and we both plan to continue advocating for vulnerable populations in and out of the hospital. I would like to thank the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship for helping cultivate in me a giving spirit that will reside in me for the rest of my life.”  William Gafford

“Unless U Strong! I learned over the past two years that not only are they strong, but also that helping to improve their well-being would be one of the great joys of my life. From the hugs and fist bumps, to the basketball games and daily walks, and finally to the dancing and singing, helping the students achieve their BEST has directly helped me achieve my BEST. It has truly been amazing to see how God has blessed our project and the school. The fellowship taught me to listen carefully to the needs of vulnerable communities, stay focused and goal oriented, and helped me to demonstrate project outcomes. Through our monthly meetings and fellowship retreats, I have learned so many valuable lessons about community engagement and responsibility. Finally, it’s my desire to live my life as Dr. Schweitzer prescribed ‘reverence for life does not allow the scholar to life for his science alone … it demands from all that they should sacrifice a portion of their own lives for others.’” Newton Tinsley

Jasmine Grayson and Micah Thomas

Jasmine Grayson and Micah Thomas

Tuskegee University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Nursing and Allied Health (Occupational Therapy)

Academic Mentor: Dr. Jannette Lewis-Clark
Site Mentor: Mr. Guy Trammel
Site: Tuskegee Youth Safe Haven

Micah and Jasmine increased the physical activity and decreased unhealthy eating habits of 9 children in the Macon County area. This was an expansion of a 2016-2017 Schweitzer project. The Fellows hosted weekly sessions, where they educated the children on healthy food options, gardening, and engaged the participants in weekly physical activity. The participants were also involved in a gardening competition, where they received 2nd place for their crops and knowledge about how they were grown. Micah and Jasmine also worked with the participants’ families to deliver healthy food options for them to try.

As a result of the program:

  • 8 out of 9 children showed an improvement in fruit and vegetable recognition via a pre- and post-test. 1 child was unable to be re-evaluated due to unavailability.
  • 9 out of 9 children showed a 100% increase in their physical activity levels via pedometer scores.

This project will be sustained by upcoming 5th Year students in the Occupational Therapy Department. These students plan to shift the focus of the project to healthy meal preparation.

“The greatest lesson I was taught through this experience was that the best way to incite a change in the world, is by you yourself, stepping up and becoming that changing force.” — Jasmine B. Grayson, OTS

“Seeing the excitement and enthusiasm that each child possessed was perhaps the most rewarding feeling of it all. The warming, yet educational atmosphere these children were able to interact in, made it all the better.” -Micah Thomas, OTS

Catherine Jones

Catherine Jones

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health (Epidemiology)

Academic Mentor: Nicole Wright, PhD, MPH
Site Mentor: Kaye Freeman
Site: East Glen Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation

Catherine addressed the health needs of 84 senior citizens by establishing an arts and crafts program for residents of a nursing and rehabilitation facility. Catherine led painting lessons to empower the residents to develop a sense of control and independence as they painted, to work fine motor skills for patients recovering from rehabilitation, to stimulate them cognitively, and to provide meaningful social interaction. Those who were physically able to paint learned proper painting techniques to increase independence and self-regard. This allowed residents to learn a new form of self-expression, communication, and to discover new aspects of their personalities and skills. Art lessons strongly promoted social cohesion amongst residents with their peers and were held twice weekly at two hours in duration each session.

As a result of Catherine’s efforts:

  • 15 out of 20 residents who regularly attended art class decreased depressive symptoms
  • 20 out of 20 participants increased their social interactions, including 17 out of 20 who increased time spent out of their room interacting with their peers.
  • 8 out of 20 residents went from passive participation in group activities to more active participation. 12 of 20 residents saw a decrease in refusal to participate in activities after participating in art class.
  • 15 out of 20 residents displayed artwork in the November art show, which raised over $300.00 to buy Christmas presents for residents of the facility.

East Glen has offered Catherine a part time position to continue lessons throughout summer of 2018. Afterwards, activity coordinators can use a guide she created with painting lessons and project ideas.

When I reflect on my experience in the Schweitzer fellowship I feel a sense of purpose. I feel a oneness with my fellow man that I have never experienced before. I met wonderful people who have made a profound impact on my life. I am sharing and teaching the joy of painting with others. I am grateful to serve the residents at East Glen. Limited physical condition does not mean one’s life is over.  I learned the residents are human beings who do not cease living just because they are in a nursing facility. I have learned that despite grave health conditions people can be very resilient. They have a strong spirit. They have hopes, aspirations, and want to live as normal a life as possible. They still want to socialize, laugh, and have attention paid to them. I feel determined to pursue a career in geriatrics and dedicate myself to researching methods to improve quality of life for elderly individuals. I want to use my talents and skills learned from my ASF experience to integrate artistic expression and its effects on fine motor skills, cognition, and quality of life into my research. I feel a life well lived is one where we try something novel every day and never close ourselves off to learning new experiences.”

Sherna Joseph

Sherna Joseph

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, Collat School of Business (MPH/MBA)

Academic Mentor: Pauline E. Jolly, PhD, MPH
Site Mentor: Thomasine Jackson
Site: East Thomas Neighborhood Association

Sherna implemented a health program for East Thomas Neighborhood Association residents to assist with navigation to health services, diabetes self-management education, and heart disease initiatives.

As a result of the program, 28 residents who participated have reported:

  • Increasing physical activity for 30 minutes 3 times per week for a minimum of 3 months
  • Increasing consumption of 3 more healthy meals or snacks per week for 3+ months
  • Reducing consumption of 1 or more sugar sweetened beverage per day for 3+ months
  • They can identify community health resources in the Birmingham area.

The project will be sustained through a Smithfield community-wide initiative, Project Powered by Wellness, where residents will work on the above goals as well as safe green public spaces. We are awaiting the status of a grant submission for the Mayor’s Community Challenge.

“The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship has been a life changing experience. I have been able to connect and learn from the other Fellows, our monthly sessions, and Kristin Boggs. Thomasine Jackson have been a complete blessing to me. She has pushed me in a number of ways personally and professionally. My project has given me the opportunity to make Birmingham my second home. I was able to serve a community similar to my community in Miami. I am grateful for the opportunity to gain project management skills, communication, and advocacy skills.”

Koushik Kasanagottu

Koushik Kasanagottu

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine

Academic Mentor: Dr. Andrea Cherrington
Site Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Clem
Site: University Medical Center

Koushik developed a clinical nutrition tool for physicians to provide health education to patients especially in underserved and rural areas. The tool contains 10 evidence-based guidelines and includes tracking forms that patients can use at home to monitor their progress.

As a result of the program, 10 participants have:

  • Selected and adhered to a lifestyle intervention of their choosing
  • Reported subjective increases in energy and satisfaction

The fellowship has transformed the way I view Social Determinants of Health. By working with patients in Dr. Clem’s clinic, I’ve realized that a physician’s role in providing healthcare extends beyond the clinic visit especially if you want to improve health outcomes. This insight will shape my future career and clinical practice.”

Carson Klein

Carson Klein

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine

Academic Mentor: Caroline Harada, MD
Site Mentor: Marianthe Grammas, MD
Site: UAB House Calls Program

Carson created a volunteer program that enlisted UAB medical to visit 15 home-bound seniors in the Birmingham community. This “Senior Companion Program” provides friendly interactions and activities in an effort to counteract the effects of social isolation. Student volunteers were paired with a home-bound senior and visited them monthly. During these monthly visits the students participated in activities that focused on the interests of their senior.

As a result of the program:

  • 15 home-bound seniors received engagement and attention from September 2017 – April 2018
  • Seniors experienced the positive effects of socialization and interactions centered around their hobbies and interests rather than their health and activities of daily living
  • 25 medical students were exposed to an at-risk patient population, and learned “new insight…and better understanding of the everyday challenges of this population”, per one volunteer

The Senior Companion Program is now a service organization within the UAB School of Medicine. Two prior volunteers will continue to grow and adapt the program as needed.

“Becoming an Albert Schweitzer Fellow gave me the opportunity to create and participate in a program that I am passionate about. I was able to serve a population that is often overlooked and unappreciated and I hope to carry the lessons I learned about humility and sacrifice with me in my career as a physician.”

Meghan Pattison

Meghan Pattison

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing

Academic Mentor: Sallie Shipman
Site Mentor: Nick Sims
Site: United Way Help Me Gro

Meghan connected families with resources they needed to set their child up for success, referring families to therapy services and counseling services for their children with newly diagnosed developmental delays.  In doing so, she improved the timely response of referrals. This is urgent because 30% of families have concerns about their child’s development and early intervention leads to improved outcomes. In her time at Help Me Grow, she helped parents navigate a system that felt foreign to them so that they knew about their options and felt empowered to advocate for their child.

As a result of the program:

  • Families’ wait times for referrals and follow up reduced from over six months to within one month
  • A resource guide exists to train future workers how to connect families with resources in the most efficient way possible
  • 10 preschool classrooms received education on how to identify and address developmental concerns

“Being a part of ASF taught me about the hard work that goes into being the holistic healthcare provider I have always wanted to be.  I now know what it takes to be a health care provider who cares for the family’s emotional, developmental and physical needs.  Because of ASF and United Way, I am better acquainted with the resources that exist in the Birmingham area that enable patients to live the fullest life.”

Jennifer Payne

Jennifer Payne

University of Montevallo, College of Education (Counseling)

Academic Mentor: Dr. Judith Harrington
Site Mentor: Mrs. Tahuna Duke
Site: The DAY Program

Jennifer conducted group therapy with 5 adolescents in an at-risk school using Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Group therapy focused on coping skills for life, including anger management. Participants also engaged in craft activities, played Quidditch, and were sorted into Hogwarts houses using Pottermore.com.

As a result of the program:

  • 4 out of 5 participants are on track to finish at least one grade level by May
  • 5 out of 5 participants achieved a behavior score of at least 80 for two consecutive months
  • 3 out of 5 participants had no more than 1 day in in-school suspension per month
  • 1 participant was observed demonstrating a new coping skill in the classroom
  • 4 out of 5 participants reported using a new coping skill outside of the classroom

“As a result of participating in this program, I was able to get to know a population of children that are often misunderstood as being ‘bad’ kids. I learned that these at-risk youth are children who face a lot of challenges and take on responsibilities at home that the average child does not—so much so that going to school every day is a big accomplishment. I plan on using my experience with the fellowship to contribute to the knowledge base within the counseling profession about at-risk youth and using literature in therapy. I would not have had this opportunity without the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship.”

Aissatou Barry-Blocker

Aissatou Barry-Blocker

University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Dentistry

Aissatou Barry-Blocker will teach simple steps in personal nutrition that can improve the oral health, and potentially reduce heart disease and diabetes, in the Hispanic and Latin communities. The nutrition education sessions will coincide with the regularly scheduled health screenings Cahaba Valley Health Care (CVHC) conducts in the target Hispanic and Latin communities.

Community Site: Cahaba Valley Health Care

Taylor Baskin

Taylor Baskin

University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Medicine

Taylor will work with students at Glenwood Autism and Behavioral Health Center to improve their health and self-esteem through dance.

Community Site: Glenwood Autism and Behavioral Health Center 

Hope Bentley and Alfonso Robinson Jr.

Hope Bentley and Alfonso Robinson Jr.

Tuskegee University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Nursing & Allied Health (Occupational Therapy)

Alfonso and Hope will establish a project that encourages healthy behavior and promotes health education among K-12 students through the combination of reading and bicycle riding.

Community Site: Tuskegee Youth Safe Haven

Sushma Boppana

Sushma Boppana

University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Medicine, Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD)

Sushma will create a patient referral system, helping patients access the services which the clinic is unable to provide. Initially, she will conduct a needs assessment, interviewing both patients and volunteers, nurses and physicians. Then, she will create a screening form and note in the EMR to be used in tracking referrals. Lastly, Sushma will develop volunteer training protocol in order to sustain the patient referral specialist role.

Community Site: Red Crescent Clinic of Alabama 

Deborah Bowers

Deborah Bowers

University of Alabama School of Nursing

Debby sought to address the delayed access to prescription medications for patients at a local FQHC. Due to transportation barriers, the clinic desires to have an on-site dispensary. Debby will conduct patient interviews to assess needs, will review charts to create a dispensary formulary and budget, and will initiate the legal approvals through two boards.

Community Site: Bessemer Neighborhood Health Center

Ayanda Chakawa

Ayanda Chakawa

Auburn University, College of Liberal Arts (Clinical psychology)

Ayanda has partnered with eight faith-based communities to work with African American parents of children aged 5-12 years old to strengthen child well-being. This project is also being supported by the Auburn University Office of Faculty Engagement through the Auburn University Competitive Outreach Scholarship Grant.

Community Site: Macon County Ministers’ Council

Caitlyn Cleghorn and Dustin Whitaker

Caitlyn Cleghorn and Dustin Whitaker

Caitlyn Cleghorn, Samford University, McWhorter School of Pharmacy
Dustin Whitaker, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Medicine

Caitlyn and Dustin will implement a medication review system for St. Vincent’s Access to Care clinic that includes health education for patients and a comprehensive clinical review of each patient’s medications.

Community Site: St. Vincent’s Birmingham, Access to Care

Shima Dowla

Shima Dowla

University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Medicine, Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD)

Shima will develop, implement, and evaluate a healthy living program for low-income adults with diabetes and obesity who receive care at Equal Access Birmingham. This program will employ strategies from the Health Behavior theory of public health with the goal of improving participants’ diet, physical activity, and medication adherence.

Community Site: Equal Access Birmingham

Ashley (A.T.) Helix

Ashley (A.T.) Helix

University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Public Health (Health Behavior)

Ashley will develop materials and provide an on-call volunteer for the friends/family members of someone who will be hospitalized for a mental health condition. The materials and volunteer will help them understand what their loved one will be experiencing while hospitalized; how they can help while their loved one is in the hospital; and how to be a support system when their loved one is released. The project will also establish a phone line that people could call if they were contemplating going to the hospital, but were nervous about the process or how it would actually help.

Community Site: Birmingham Crisis Center

Frances Isbell

Frances Isbell

University of Alabama, School of Law

Frances will open a chapter of NMD United in the state of Alabama and create a support network for teens and adults with neuromuscular conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Frances will also organize pro bono legal clinics, aimed at helping that population access the resources they need to live independently.

Community Site: NMD United and others (TBD)

Kelly McMurray

Kelly McMurray

Alabama State University, College of Health Sciences (Prosthetics & Orthotics)

Kelly has partnered with a local prosthetic and orthotic clinic to hold monthly meetings with patients on health and wellness topics.

Community Site: River Region Prosthetics & Orthotics Clinic, TBD

David Osula

David Osula

University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Medicine

David is developing the Academy of Health Sciences Mentoring Program for local, inner-city high school students who are interested in healthcare careers.

Community Site: Carver High School, Academy of Health Sciences

Rachel Stokes

Rachel Stokes

University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Public Health (Environmental Health Sciences)

Rachel will address environmental health in Birmingham by increasing environmental stewardship through capacity building and outreach events. This project will provide education and opportunities for youth in Birmingham to discover, engage, and explore their environment, while promoting behavioral changes that will lead to a cleaner, more sustainable environment for the community.

Community Site: Village Creek Society

Sarah Teitell

Sarah Teitell

University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Medicine

Sarah proposes to improve pregnant and preventive health behaviors for pregnant and parenting teenage mothers at Project Independence. She will be developing a health education curriculum that will cover various topics of interest pertaining to health during pregnancy, early pediatric health, and general women’s health to be presented during the biweekly groups.

Community Site: Children’s Aid Society              

Stay in touch!

We want to hear from our fellows – let us know where you are and what you’re up to!

You can also submit story ideas for the Fellows for Life newsletter.

What is the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship?